Global Warming Essay Argumentative Back to all templates
Section 1

The introduction to your argumentative research paper should include a thesis in which you take a stance on a controversial issue. Your thesis is the main argument you will be supporting with further claims and evidence. 

Introduction

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

Global warming is a [controversial/polarizing/persistent] issue that many people have o-strong=" opinions about. Global warming [is/is not] a valid threat because [provide your main claim for why global warming is or is not a valid threat.]

 

Starting Sentence Option 2:

 

There is o-strong=" debate in our society about the threat level posed by global warming. Global warming [is/is not] a [true/real/high-level] threat because [provide your main claim for why global warming is or is not a threat to humanity.]

 

Example Opening Claims for the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming:

 

  • Scientific research proves an overall warming trend which will have a direct impact on human civilization. 
  • A measurable warming trend is already impacting our earth. 

 

Example Opening Claims Against the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming: 

 

  • Scientific research does not prove that a current warming trend suggests imminent danger.
  • There is not a large enough body of research to support the theories. 

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page


 

Section 2

In this paragraph, you introduce a first claim to support your thesis. Provide evidence for your claim by referencing a piece of research, a fact or a statistic. Remember that the purpose of your argumentative research paper is to persuade your reader that your thesis is viable. 

First Claim Paragraph

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

Research suggests that global warming [is/is not] a valid threat because [provide your first claim for why global warming is or is not a valid threat.]

 

Starting Sentence Option 2:

 

There is sufficient evidence for the fact that Global warming [is/is not] a [true/real/high-level] threat, such as the research by [name of expert or organization] which proved that [provide a fact or statistic supporting your thesis.]

 

Example Claims for the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming:

 

  • Measurable changes in the sea level, air temperature and atmospheric gas levels confirm a warming trend.
  • A warming trend in our climate is causing the melting of earth's glaciers and ice caps which will cause the sea levels to rise and pose an imminent threat to coastal regions.
  • The health of the ocean is failing due to increased temperature, causing mass deaths of fish and the overgrowth of dangerous algae. 
  • Models used by scientists to predict climate change generally show an overall warming trend. 

Example Claims Against the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming: 

 

  • Scientific research does not prove that a current warming trend suggests imminent danger.
  • There is not a large enough body of research to support the theories. 
  • There is not enough historical data available. 
  • The models used by scientists to predict climate change are unreliable and many have been proven wrong. 

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page



Section 3

In this paragraph, you introduce a second claim to support your thesis. Provide evidence for your claim by referencing a piece of research, a fact or a statistic. Aim to use a variety of reliable references to strengthen your argument. 

Second Claim Paragraph

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

Another key finding suggests that global warming [is/is not] a valid threat by [proving/suggesting] that [provide your second claim for why global warming is or is not a valid threat.]

 

Starting Sentence Option 2:


Additional proof for the fact that Global warming [is/is not] a [true/real/high-level] threat, involves the [research/findings] of [name of expert or organization] which proved that [provide a fact or statistic supporting your thesis.]

 

Example Claims for the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming:

 

  • Measurable changes in the sea level, air temperature and atmospheric gas levels confirm a warming trend.
  • A warming trend in our climate is causing the melting of earth's glaciers and ice caps which will cause the sea levels to rise and pose an imminent threat to coastal regions.
  • The health of the ocean is failing due to increased temperature, causing mass deaths of fish and the overgrowth of dangerous algae. 
  • Models used by scientists to predict climate change generally show an overall warming trend. 

Example Claims Against the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming: 

 

  • Scientific research does not prove that a current warming trend suggests imminent danger.
  • There is not a large enough body of research to support the theories. 
  • There is not enough historical data available. 
  • The models used by scientists to predict climate change are unreliable and many have been proven wrong. 

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page



Section 4

In this paragraph, you introduce a third claim to support your thesis. Provide evidence for your claim by referencing a piece of research, a fact or a statistic. Consider strengthening your argument by including a direct quote from an expert on your topic whose positon is similar to yours. 

Third Claim Paragaph

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

The expert [name of expert or researcher] confirmed that global warming [is/is not] a valid threat by [proving/suggesting/establishing] that [provide a third claim for why global warming is or is not a valid threat.]

 

Starting Sentence Option 2:

 

Another researcher, [name of expert or research group] found that [summarize a finding that supports your thesis], further proving that global warming [is/is not] a valid threat to humanity.

 

Example Claims for the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming:

 

  • Measurable changes in the sea level, air temperature and atmospheric gas levels confirm a warming trend.
  • A warming trend in our climate is causing the melting of earth's glaciers and ice caps which will cause the sea levels to rise and pose an imminent threat to coastal regions.
  • The health of the ocean is failing due to increased temperature, causing mass deaths of fish and the overgrowth of dangerous algae. 
  • Models used by scientists to predict climate change generally show an overall warming trend. 

Example Claims Against the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming: 

 

  • Scientific research does not prove that a current warming trend suggests imminent danger.
  • There is not a large enough body of research to support the theories. 
  • There is not enough historical data available. 
  • The models used by scientists to predict climate change are unreliable and many have been proven wrong. 

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page


Section 5

In this paragraph, you introduce a fourth claim to support your thesis. Provide evidence for your claim by referencing a piece of research, a fact or a statistic. Consider including a reference to a top researcher on your topic whose perspective would strengthen your argument. 

Fourth Claim Paragraph

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

Further evidence supports that global warming [is/is not] a [valid threat/danger to humanity], namely the work of [name of expert or research group whose findings support your thesis.] [Continue by quoting, summarizing or paraphrasing the research.]

 

Starting Sentence Option 2:

 

Research by [name of expert or research group] established another fact proving the [reality/unreality] of global warming: [Insert direct quote from research that supports your thesis.]

 

Example Claims for the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming:

 

  • Measurable changes in the sea level, air temperature and atmospheric gas levels confirm a warming trend.
  • A warming trend in our climate is causing the melting of earth's glaciers and ice caps which will cause the sea levels to rise and pose an imminent threat to coastal regions.
  • The health of the ocean is failing due to increased temperature, causing mass deaths of fish and the overgrowth of dangerous algae. 
  • Models used by scientists to predict climate change generally show an overall warming trend. 

Example Claims Against the Reality of the Threat of Global Warming: 

 

  • Scientific research does not prove that a current warming trend suggests imminent danger.
  • There is not a large enough body of research to support the theories. 
  • There is not enough historical data available. 
  • The models used by scientists to predict climate change are unreliable and many have been proven wrong. 

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page


 


Section 6

The closing statement should summarize your main argument and provide any final evidence to wrap up loose ends. The conclusion should give your reader a sense of why the issue is relevant or important. In an argumentative research paper, you may choose to include a "call to action" in which you describe something that others can do if they agree with your argument. 

Closing Statement

Starting Sentence Option 1:

 

With so much evidence in support of [summarize your thesis], it is unrealistic to believe otherwise. 

 

Starting Sentence Option 2: 

 

The evidence overwhelmingly supports the fact that [summarize your thesis.]

 

Example References:

 

EasyBib Guide to Global Warming Research

 

NASA Home Page for Climate Change

 

U.S. Global Change Research Program Home Page



Section 7

It is important to document exactly where you found the information you used in your paper. Your references will often come from published sources including books, articles, other research papers and electronic sources such as web sites, e-books and audio or video media. 

General Information about Creating a References Page:

 

http://nob.cs.ucdavis.edu/classes/ecs015-2007-02/paper/citations.html

 

References/Works Cited

Helpful Links:

 

 EasyBib 

 

Citation Machine

 

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