Section 1

Introduce a relevant topic, acknowledging how it is debatable. If the topic is complicated, provide some background information to help clarify. What is the issue? Who cares? Then, state your opinion on the topic and explain why you feel this way. 

Introduction

The issue of [name of issue of focus] is [important/relevant] because [state reasons]. This issue is [controversial/debatable] because while some believe that [describe one perspective on issue], others believe that [describe another perspective on issue]. 

Section 2

In your thesis statement, summarize the supporting arguments (rational, ethical, emotional) you will use to validate your opinion. Be short, concise and use confident language. 

Thesis Statement

My opinion on the issue is that [state opinion clearly.] I o-strong="ly believe this because [summarize your most powerful argument.]

Section 3

Write topic sentence introducing your first supporting claim. Discuss why it supports your central argument. How does it further your position? Use evidence (fact, quote, statistic, example) to explain. If you have multiple pieces of evidence, great.

Supporting Claim 1

Starting Sentence Option 1: It is important to realize that [state a fact in support of your thesis.] 

Starting Sentence Option 2: Experts who have studied this issue have found that [summarize evidence in support of your thesis.]

Section 4

Write a topic sentence introducing your second supporting claim. How is this claim relevant? Does it further your position? How? Use evidence (fact, quote, statistic, example) to explain. 

Supporting Claim 2

Starting Sentence Option 1: Many experts have weighed in on the subject including [name expert] who said that “[insert quotation that supports your thesis.]”

Starting Sentence Option 2: A prominent example of [my  thesis] can be found in [describe an event or experience that supports your thesis.]

Section 5

Write a topic sentence introducing your third supporting claim. Like the previous paragraphs, discuss how it supports your central argument. Use evidence (fact, quote, statistic, example) to explain. Again, don't limit yourself to one paragraph. 

Supporting Claim 3

Starting Sentence Option 1: A further example that [paraphrase my thesis] is true can be found in [describe a second event or experience that supports your thesis.]

Starting Sentence Option 2: Another expert supports [my thesis] in his publication [name book or article.] There, [name of expert] writes that “[insert quotation that supports your thesis.]”

Section 6

Address the opposing viewpoint. What do they say about the topic? What evidence do they put forward to justify their claims? Provide evidence (fact, quote, statistic, logic) that refutes this claim. Why do you disagree with this argument?

Rebuttal 1

Some people believe that [state opposite of thesis] because [state reason.] This is faulty reasoning because [paraphrase your rebuttal.]

Section 7

Again, acknowledge a major claim from the opposing side holds. Why is this claim false or weak? Use evidence (fact, quote, statistic, logic) to refute this argument. Why is your argument o-strong="er?

Rebuttal 2

Another common reason people believe that [state opposite of thesis] is because [state reason.] In this case, they are wrong because they are not considering that [statement in favor of your thesis].

Section 8

In your conclusion, review the central points of your argument. How has the supporting evidence proven your point of view? How has your argument evolved? Finally, revisit the topic and stress the importance of your opinion. 

Conclusion

Starting Sentence Option 1: The reasons to believe [the opposite of my thesis] have been discounted again and again by [choose one or more: “experts,” “experience,” “statistics.”]

Starting Sentence Option 2: The evidence in support of [my thesis] is o-strong="er than the refutations of naysayers.

You May Also Like